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Short Fiction

Anthologies:


A Book of Blasphemous Words: Book of Blasphemous Words is a weird fiction, horror, and speculative fiction anthology about humanity’s relationship with its gods. Contains my Paleolithic story, "Killing the First Gods."




A Breath from the Sky: (Martian Migraine Press). Alien spectra that devour and derange. Haunted masks. Demons of rage and revenge, spirits of madness and mercy. Consuming AI, killer earworms, immortal cannibals, and entities beyond your comprehension. All these and more await you within. DO YOU DARE PLAY HOST? Contains my story, "Promontory."



Dark Hall Press Ghost Anthology: A collection of ghost stories from authors such as Gordon Clemmons, Margaret Wittock, and Tim Bayliss. Includes my story "Again and Again."




Game Fiction Volume 1: Goldshader Press presents A collection of game related speculative fiction including work from Justin McElroy, Halli Lilburn, Robin Dunn, and Joanna Koch. Includes my story "Distractions."



Horror and History, Oh My!: Twenty historical horror stories presented for your consideration. Learn the real reasons behind the trial of Socrates, the curse of Glamis Castle, and the writing of the Book of the Dead. Featured authors include T. Fox Dunham, Kevin Wetmore, Gwendolyn Kiste, and Guy Burtenshaw. Includes my Roman Horror story, "What the Prodigy Learns."




Second Contacts: Bundoran Press presents seventeen stories from writers in six countries (Canada, United States, England, Mexico, Israel, and the Netherlands) that answer the question: What happens after first contact? Set fifty years in the future, they explore the aftermath of alien contact, for us and for them. With stories by Barry King, Jetse De Vries, Nicole Lavigne, and Robin Wyatt Dunn. Includes my story "This Beautiful Creature."



The New Accelerator, Issue #2: The New Accelerator is bi-monthly anthology of Science Fiction short stories, published through Apple's Newsstand app and Google's Play Store. Issue #2 showcases ten exciting speculative fiction works, including my story "War-Zones."

The New Accelerator, Issue #6: The New Accelerator is bi-monthly anthology of Science Fiction short stories, published through Apple's Newsstand app and Google's Play Store. Issue #2 showcases ten exciting speculative fiction works, including my story "The Correspondent."



The Year's Best Transhuman SFGehenna & Hinnom presents the Year's Best Transhuman SF 2017 Anthology, the most comprehensive telling of our species' future ever to be read by non-cybernetic eyes. As technology progresses, so does its connection with mankind. Contains my story, "Machinery of Ghosts."





Yesterday You Said Tomorrow: The past has past, the present is tense, and the future is always uncertain. The challenge put forth to the intrepid writers in this collection was to write a story within the paradigm of fixed timeline time travel. Includes my story "Drop-ins"


All Short Fiction:

"Again and Again" Dark Hall Press Ghost Anthology, Dark Hall Press (2013)

"Belongings" Theme of Absence website (2014)

"Children of Frogs" Daily Science Fiction website (2014)

"Distractions" Game Fiction Volume 1, Goldshader Press (2015)

"Drop-ins" Yesterday You Said Tomorrow Anthology, Burnt Offerings (2014)

"Implicate Order" Lamplight Magazine Volume 6 Issue 2 (2017)

"Killing the First Gods" A Book of Blasphemous Words Anthology, A Murder of Storytellers (2017)

"Machinery of Ghosts" Gehenna and Hinnom Books, The Year's Best Transhuman SF anthology (2017)

"Promontory" A Breath of the Sky anthology published by Martian Migraine Press (2017)

"The Boy in the Picture" Grievous Angel website (2017)

"The Correspondent" The New Accelerator, Issue #6, The New Accelerator (2015)

"The Ferry Back" Collateral Fiction, Issue 2.1 (2017)

"The Green Rope" Subtle Fiction Website (2017)

"The Mystagogue" Cyclopean Digital Magazine, Issue #1, Cyclopean Press (2016)

"The Yuru-chara of Hector, NY" Electric Spec Magazine, Volume 11, Issue 4 (2016)

"This Beautiful Creature" Second Contacts Anthology, Bundoran Press (2015)

"War-Zones" The New Accelerator, Issue #2, The New Accelerator (2014)

"What Little We Know" Fantasia Divinity Magazine Issue 17, Fantasia Divinity Magazine and Publishing (2017)

"What the Prodigy Learns" History and Horror, Oh My! Anthology, Mystery and Horror, LLC (2014)

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