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Wrapping up "Agent Shield and Spaceman"

After more than a year, it's finished!

I started "Agent Shield and Spaceman," last year after listening to another writer talk about the rewards and challenges of self-publishing a novel. I got excited about the possibility of telling a complete story one chapter at a time, releasing it to the public, and telling the story I wanted to tell.

I can without reservation say the experience was rewarding for me personally. I've gotten into a nice pattern of writing short stories, submitting them, and seeing a few published. But to be in charge of the process from word go has been incredibly liberating and also terrifying. The best of "Agent Shield" is also the best of me as a writer and I hope at least some of what I've written has diverted and entertained you.

So, what's next?

I definitely intend to collect all of the chapters together for an e-book edition of the novel. I'd probably sell it through Amazon or Smashmouth, we'll see what sort of hoops I have to jump through. I'm reasonably proud of the work I've done but I know that there are plenty of typos and corrections I'd like to make for any final edition. I'm also trying to decide if I want to commish cover art to go along with it or simply paint my own.

Decisions, decisions.

At any rate, the link to the final chapter is list below along with a link to the first chapter. I'm going on vacation for awhile but I expect before the end of the summer to have a complete list of chapters on Ancient Logic for convenience sake.

Thank you very much for your support and, most importantly, for reading! None of this would've been possible without you.

Links:
Epilogue
First Chapter
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