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New Story announcement

My new short story, "The Correspondent" is now available on Issue #6 of The New Accelerator, an e-zine available through Apple Newsstand and Google Play. This is one of my favorite stories I've written so far and I'm pleased to have this tale of child soldiers fighting in an endless war finally in print. 

Those wishing to read the story should follow either of these links (Apple, Google) on their mobile device to subscribe to the newsletter. Issue #6 only costs a dollar and you get plenty of great stories besides mine.

Description of The New Accelerator.

The New Accelerator is a fresh and dynamic anthology of Science Fiction stories. We have collected the most astonishing, perplexing, innovative, and satisfying short stories for you, our readers. We want to share with you the delights and shocks, the thrills and awe that these stories provide.Download the app and enjoy our preview issue for free.Issues are published monthly, and subscription is approximately $1 per month (local tax rates apply).Subscriptions are billed and auto-renewed every month as follows: • Subscriptions may be managed by the user and auto-renewal may be turned off by going to the user's Account Settings after purchase.• Payment will be charged to iTunes account at confirmation of purchase. • Subscription automatically renews unless auto-renew is turned off at least 24 hours before the end of the current period. • Account will be charged for renewal within 24 hours prior to the end of the current period, at the monthly rate at the time of renewal. • No cancellation of the current subscription is allowed during active subscription period. 
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