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What I Read in October

I fell a little behind in my reading this month. Mostly this was for good reasons as I hope to reveal either next month or January. Even so, there were a few stories that caught my eye that I’ll talk up below. 
  1. For Salvation by Michael B Tager. (Gamine Fiction volume 1) This was my favorite story from the Gold Shader “Game Fiction Volume 1” anthology my story “Distractions appeared in last month. This is a bit of a slow burn but the story gives clear sense of dread and purpose.
  2. Ice by Rich Larson (Clarkesworld) This slice of life story set on a frozen world called New Greenland revolves around the efforts to human civilization to adapt to environments clearly not meant for human civilization. Curious story in that it's about the tension between all sorts of post-human elaboration and the always  perilous crust of brother relations. As someone with a brother, this story really registered.
  3. Cats’ Game by Michelle Muenzler. (DSF) A little bit of the Lottery mixed with a character study of a truly formitable Russian Great Grandmother. Very much like how the ending is handled, making it clear what happened without telling.
  4. Some Gods of El Paso by Maria Dahvana Headley (Tor.com) Great first line. This is about living in the middle of things, being an outlaw with feet in two worlds. A story told in a delirious half-drunk manner about two delirious profane and lusty shamans. Its dry as dust fairy tale style really works for this take. Modern myth making at its finest.
  5. Hold Time Violations by John Chu (Tor.com) Interesting story set in Boston about universes glitching and a daughter trying to heal them through the half-remembered instructions of her mother. ANother example of a hard-sci using magical realism elements to tell a truly fantastic and yet tightly speculative story. Good stuff. 
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